Mathilde Cohen

Associate Professor of Law and Robert D. Glass Scholar
Mathilde Cohen Headshot
860-570-5268
Office: Hosmer 207
  • Comparative and European Law
  • Constitutional Law
  • Courts and Judges
  • Food Law
  • Jurisprudence

Mathilde Cohen works in the fields of jurisprudence, comparative law, constitutional law, food law, and gender and law. Her work is cross-disciplinary, spanning a variety of subjects, including deliberative democracy, judicial decision-making, and the gendering and racialization of food.

Much of Professor Cohen’s published work has focused on the way in which courts of last resort, domestic or international, make and justify their decisions. This research has been supported with a grant from Droit et Justice, the French Ministry of Justice’s research unit. Currently, Professor Cohen is studying the way in which the United States and France regulate milk, both animal and human. She is conducting fieldwork in both countries to uncover the deep similarities between the two kinds of milk as well as the legal, economic, and political issues raised by milk production and consumption. In 2015, she received the Hessel Yntema Prize from the American Society of Comparative Law for the “most outstanding” article by a scholar under 40 appearing in the previous year’s volume of the American Journal of Comparative Law.

A graduate of the École Normale Supérieure and the Sorbonne in Paris, where she received undergraduate and graduate degrees in law and philosophy, Professor Cohen earned her LL.M. and J.S.D. as a Fulbright Scholar at Columbia Law School. While at Columbia, she was named a James Kent Scholar and served as the head articles editor for the Columbia Journal of European Law. Before joining the UConn faculty in 2012, Professor Cohen was an associate-in-law at Columbia Law and a research fellow at the French Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique.

Mathilde CohenThe Linguistic Design of Multinational Courts. The French Capture, Int’l J. Const. L. (forthcoming).

Mathilde CohenJudges or Hostages? The Bureaucratization of the Court of Justice of the European Union and the European Court of Human Rights, in European Law Stories (Bill Davies & Fernanda Nicola, eds., forthcoming, Cambridge UP).

Mathilde CohenThe French Case for Requiring Juries to Give Reasons. Safeguarding Defendants or Guarding the Judges? in Comparative Criminal Procedure Handbook (Jacqueline Ross & Steven Thaman, eds., forthcoming, Elgar Press).

Mathilde Cohen, When Judges Have Reasons Not to Give Reasons—A Comparative Law Approach, 72 Wash. & Lee L. Rev. 483 (2015)

Mathilde Cohen, The Social Epistemology of Public Institutions in New Waves in Philosophy of Law 185 (Maksymilian del Mar, ed., Palgrave Macmillan, 2011)

Mathilde Cohen, Reasons for Reasons in Approaches to Legal Rationality 119 (Logic, Epistemology, and the Unity of Science Springer Series Vol. 20) (Dov M. Gabbay et al, eds., 2010)

Mathilde Cohen, Sincerity and Reason Giving: When May Legal Decision-Makers Lie?, 59 DePaul L. Rev. 1091 (2010)

Mathilde Cohen, The Rule of Law as the Rule of Reasons, 96 Archiv für Rechts- und Sozialphilosophie 1 (2010)

Mathilde Cohen, Reason Giving in Court Practice: Decision-Makers at the Crossroads, 14 Colum. J. Eur. L. 257 (2008)