Maureen Johnson

Assistant Clinical Professor

Professor Maureen Johnson graduated from Loyola Law School, Los Angeles, where she was a Sayre MacNeil Scholar and served on the Loyola of Los Angeles Entertainment Law Review. She began her legal career at Mayer Brown, where she worked on appeals, class action litigation, and employment law. She continued her litigation practice at Kaye, Scholer LLP, where she represented numerous clients worldwide and honed her skills in antitrust law.

Professor Johnson previously taught at Loyola Law School, Los Angeles, for six years, followed by a year teaching in the legal writing department at the William S. Boyd School of Law at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, as a visiting faculty member.

Professor Johnson is particularly interested in the intersection between social and legal rhetoric. Her article examining the use of emotive appeal in U.S. Supreme Court briefs has been featured in a Legal Scholarship Highlight on SCOTUSblog.com and has been used by professors in upper-division writing classes throughout the nation

Having earned an MFA in screenwriting from UCLA, Professor Johnson has a particular interest in storytelling in the legal profession. In April 2017 Professor Johnson launched #EQ4ALL@LLS, a diversity webpage that profiles individuals committed to equality for all.

Maureen Johnson, Separate But (Un)Equal: Why Institutionalized Anti-Racism is the Answer to the Never-Ending Cycle of Plessy v. Ferguson, 52 U. Rich. L. Rev. 327 (2018).

Maureen Johnson, You Had Me at Hello: Examining the Impact of Powerful Introductory Emotional Hooks Set Forth in Appellate Briefs Filed in Recently Hotly-Contested U.S. Supreme Court Decisions, 49 Indiana L. Rev. 397 (2016)