Behind the Games: The Effect of the Olympics on Host Cities

Event:
Behind the Games: The Effect of the Olympics on Host Cities
Date:
Friday, April 12, 2019 9:00 am to 4:00 pm
Presented By:
Description:

The Connecticut Journal of International Law presents a symposium on the Olympic Games, which have long been celebrated as a beacon of international cooperation, a pinnacle of human achievement, and a catalyst for positive change. Nevertheless, debate rages as to whether the Games benefit the cities that host them. Following each closing ceremony, communities, activists, and economists question whether the opportunities for positive change have been realized. Analyzing the differences between a successful and a destructive Olympic Games provides valuable instruction in successful event planning, which can be implemented in future local, regional, and national events.

Our panels will focus on the capacity of the Games to serve as either an instrument for advocacy or for the suppression of human rights protections, the land use and urban development strategies implemented by host cities and organizers, and the economic impacts and viability of the Games.

We invite you to join legal scholars, leading economists, and practitioners in exploring these issues. Participants are encouraged to attend the networking reception at the end of the day.

Schedule:
9:00 am - 9:30 am
CHECK IN AND CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST
9:30 am - 9:45 am
WELCOME
  • Paul Milliken, Editor-in-Chief, Connecticut Journal of International Law
  • Dean Timothy Fisher, University of Connecticut School of Law
9:45 am - 11:00 am
LAND USE AND THE OLYMPIC GAMES: EXAMINING THE BLUEPRINTS

Mega sporting events, and the Olympics in particular, require infrastructure development and land use planning on a massive scale.  This panel will discuss how Olympic developments interact with property regimes through different property laws and states of title, the struggles that host cities have faced in efficiently and effectively implementing urban development strategies, and the global legacy of failed Olympic bids.

  • Moderator: Bethany Berger, Wallace Stevens Professor of Law, University of Connecticut School of Law
  • Panelists:
    • Dr. Judith Grant Long, Professor of Sport Management and Urban Planning, University of Michigan
    • Irina Manta, Professor of Law, Hofstra University Maurice A. Deane School of Law School
    • Dr. John Lauermann, Assistant Professor of Geography, City University of New York (CUNY)
11:00 am - 11:15 am
BREAK
11:15 am - 12:30 pm
HUMAN RIGHTS ON THE PODIUM: GOING FOR GOLD

The Olympic Games provide an international spotlight for human rights issues.  Historically, this spotlight has revealed both heroic advocacy efforts and extreme human rights violations.  This panel will discuss the application of human rights principles in the context of the Games and will explore the roles of the International Olympic Committee and International Sports Federations.     

  • Moderator: Valeria Gomez, William R. Davis Clinical Teaching Fellow, University of Connecticut School of Law
  • Panelists:
    • Gigi Alford, Head of Sport and Human Rights, UNI Global Union’s World Player’s Association
    • Ryan Gauthier, Professor of Law, Thompson Rivers University
12:30 pm - 2:00 pm
LUNCH INCLUDING KEYNOTE ADDRESS
1:15 pm - 2:00 pm
KEYNOTE ADDRESS

Jules Boykoff is a professor, activist, and widely published author.  He has written three books on the Olympics—Power Games: A Political History of the Olympics (Verso, 2016), Activism and the Olympics: Dissent at the Games in Vancouver and London (Rutgers University Press, 2014), and Celebration Capitalism and the Olympic Games (Routledge, 2013).  Several of his research interests include the politics of sports, mass-media politics, and social movements.  He also offers an insider’s perspective into the world of mega-sporting events as a former professional soccer player, representing the U.S. Olympic Team in international competition and playing for the Portland Pride, Minnesota Thunder, and Milwaukee Wave.

Boykoff holds a Ph.D. in political science from American University.  He currently teaches political science at Pacific University in Oregon. 

2:00 pm - 2:15 pm
BREAK
2:15 pm - 3:30 pm
ECONOMIC VIABILITY OF THE GAMES: AN OLYMPIC-SIZED BILL

The Olympic Games and the surrounding spectacles inevitably create an influx of tourism to host cities, which generates revenue for both the city and local businesses.  However, the costs associated with hosting the Games and maintaining or adapting Olympic facilities have skyrocketed, forcing many prospective hosts to back out of their bids.  This panel will analyze both sides of this fundamental economic problem for host cities with a specific look at the Boston 2024 Olympic bid.  

3:30 pm - 3:45 pm
CLOSING STATEMENTS
3:45 pm - 5:00 pm
NETWORKING RECEPTION AND ICE CREAM SOCIAL
Location:

Reading Room

Reading Room
William F. Starr Hall
45 Elizabeth St.
Hartford, CT 06105-2290
Contact:
If you require reasonable accommodations for a disability, please contact the Law School at 860-570-5130 or via email at law.access@uconn.edu at least two weeks in advance.