UConn Law students in class.
Course of Study

The course of study at UConn Law is a very purposeful curriculum.  A schedule of more than 200 class sections each year is a mix of doctrinal courses, giving students the breadth of legal knowledge; specialized seminars, providing the depth of knowledge; and practicum courses, honing the legal skills required in the legal community.  The placement of these courses in the 1L and upper division years is also by design.  The path to a Juris Doctor degree for each University of Connecticut School of Law student is uniquely theirs, but it is always well structured and complete.

First Year (1L) Curriculum

The scheduling and placement of students in 1L required courses (excluding the stat/reg requirement) is done by the Registrar and students are required to complete these courses in the division in which they begin their law studies.  It is this purposeful sectioning of new law students into student cohort groups that allows students to begin to immediately form the collegial bond so important in legal study.  The 1L course of study is a mix of large lecture size courses and small group sections. 

  Three Year Day Division Four Year Evening Division Four Year Day Division
Fall Term Civil Procedure
Contracts
Lawyering Process
Torts
Criminal Law
Civil Procedure I
Lawyering Process
Torts
Contracts I
Civil Procedure
Contracts
Lawyering Process
Torts
Winter Term Moot Court   Moot Court
Spring Term Constitutional Law
Lawyering Process
Property
Stat/Reg Elective
Civil Procedure II
Lawyering Process
Contracts II
Criminal Law
Constitutional Law
Lawyering Process
Property

June Term

 

Moot Court

 

Fall Term

Second Year

 

Constitutional Law
AND/OR Property
Stat/Reg Elective
Criminal Law
Stat/Reg Elective*

Spring Term

Second Year

  Constitutional Law
AND/OR Property
Stat/Reg Elective*
Upper Division Curriculum

During the upper division years, students must include successful completion of their upperclass writing requirement, practice based learning requirement, and Legal Profession in their course of study.  There is no requirement as to which term(s) these are completed, though it is strongly suggested that the upperclass writing requirement be started no later than their penultimate semester of study.  This allows for drafting requirements.

The selection of courses in the upper division years without many additional requirements allows students to tailor their curriculum to their interest.  The placement of courses required for the bar examination at differing times throughout the day and multiple times per year is done to encourage enrollment in these courses.  Students will also find multiple sections of basic, foundational courses which may serve as the prerequisite to specialized seminar courses.  The many clinical programs are a part of the upper division curriculum.  Whether taken on campus or as part of fieldwork, a clinic is a vital learning experience.  A well-rounded legal education also includes courses in jurisprudence, legal theory, and legal history, which help students gain broader perspectives on the law and the legal system.

Outside of the Classroom

For many students, their course of study is not confined to the classroom.  Beyond traditional course work, opportunities for academic credit are found in enrollment in individual externships or independent research projects.  Students may also serve as members of one of the Law Journals or the Connecticut Law Review.  The honing of legal writing and reasoning can also be accomplished by participation in a Moot Court Competition.