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Connecticut Journal of International Law

Founded in 1985, the Connecticut Journal of International Law, known as CJIL on campus, is a scholarly journal that publishes two issues every school year. We publish articles that cover a wide range of topics in international law, comparative law, and the extraterritorial effect of United States law and policy. We publish articles written by professors, judges, practitioners and students. The journal also sponsors a symposium on campus every year, with topics ranging from the Cambodian War Crimes Tribunals to the effect of Wal-Mart in an international economy. On this website, you will find contact information for the current editorial board and membership and information about submitting articles to the Journal for publication, and articles published in the Journal will soon be available.

Connecticut Journal of International Law publishes two issues per year on topics concerning both public and private international law. While articles, book reviews and commentary by internationally recognized scholars and practitioners comprise a substantial portion of the Journal, student notes and comments also are essential to the success of the periodical. Circulated internationally, the Journal is wholly student-managed and edited. In addition, the Journal sponsors a number of campus lectures, panel discussions, and social events open to the entire Law School community each semester.

Advisor:  Mark Janis

Editorial Board: 2013-2014

Editor-in-Chief:  Mike Roberts
Managing Editor:  Shannon Daley
Assistant Managing Editor:  Janine Beauregard
Administrative Editor:  Angela Vickery
Lead Articles Editor:  Philip Liu

Other Members

Articles Editors: Matt Kalthoff, Eric Van Ausdal, Alexander Cogbill

Executive Editors: Bill Brooks, Ryan Cook, Stephanie Lee, Kelly Wall, Alexander Cogbill, Scott Siedor

Symposium Editors: Ross Gionfriddo, Kelly Smith, Carolyn Wlodarczyk

Research Editor: Caitlin Peruccio

Competition Editor: Nisha Kapur

Information Technology Editor: Ryan Downing

Associate Editors: Justin Ankerman, Kris Kauffman, Alex Kovtunenko

Associate Members: Jade Baldwin, Thadius Bochain, John D'Baptist, Thomas Durkin, Allen Even, Ellen Feeney, Robert Fontaine, Megan Gentry, Andrew Glass, Carolina Guiral Cuervo, Tyler Haynes, Spencer Hill, Sasha Jordison, Lauren Kostes, Ryan Landauer, Rachel Lavina, Gyu-Jin Lee, Milan Moore, Thomas Petschauer, Brittany Rehmer, Maria Rodriguez, Ivan Tereschenko, Nate Valeri, Raymond Withers-Tong

Contact Information

Connecticut Journal of International Law
University of Connecticut School of Law
65 Elizabeth Street
Hartford, CT 06105-2290

Telephone: 860-570-5297
Facsimile: 860-570-5299
General Email: cjil@students.law.uconn.edu
Article Submissions: cjil.articles@gmail.com

The current issue is Volume 26, number 2.

Articles

21ST CENTURY AFRICA AS AN “ARC OF (IN)STABILITY”: U.S. AND AFRICAN ECONOMIC, SECURITY, AND DEVELOPMENT POLICIES ADVANCED THROUGH U.S. AFRICA COMMAND INITIATIVES

Kevin H. Govern 

 

THE NATURE AND DEVELOPMENT OF LAW IN ISLAM AND THE RULE OF LAW CHALLENGE IN THE MIDDLE EAST AND THE MUSLIM WORLD

Hossein Esmaeili

Abstract:  While Islamic law is a traditional and religious legal system, it is one of the three major legal systems of the world, after common law and civil law systems. The legal system of Islam differs from other modern legal systems, and has its own history of development and a unique nature. The concept and nature of law in Islam is related to another modern concept: the doctrine of the rule of law. While the rule of law doctrine has become an important agenda of international law and international relations, an effective system incorporating the rule of law is presently unavailable in most Middle Eastern and Muslim countries. This paper analyzes the nature and the meaning of law in the Islamic legal system within a historical and philosophical context from a modern perspective. This paper draws on various traditional principles and recent practical implications of Islamic law as it applies in Muslim societies, analyzes the nature of law in the legal system of Islam, and investigates the possibility of gradually developing a rule of law based system in Muslim countries, without the sudden imposition of foreign codes, legal principles and legal systems.

 

LEGAL OPERATIONAL ADVICE IN THE ISRAELI DEFENSE FORCES: THE INTERNATIONAL LAW DEPARTMENT AND THE CHANGING NATURE OF INTERNATIONAL HUMANITARIAN LAW

Amichai Cohen

Abstract:  The International Law Department (ILD) of the Israel Defense Forces (IDF) is a small unit of lawyers, entrusted with implementing the Laws of Armed Conflict within the IDF, through “legal operational advice.” This article analyzes the history and character of this unit, in view of recent operations of the IDF, and accusations of war crimes waged against IDF officers. The article suggests that the work of the ILD should be seen as part of the internalization of the Laws of Armed Conflict within Israeli society. The Laws of Armed Conflict have significantly developed in recent years. However, these developments are sometimes vague, and lack domestic legitimacy. ILD lawyers both interpret the relatively vague notions of the international law, and contribute to the creation of new legal norms. This process of internalization is essential in the attainment of legitimacy to the Laws of Armed Conflict, and to the transformation of domestic Israeli perceptions about this part of international law. The article also suggests how to improve the performance of the ILD, thereby enabling it to improve its performance and the process of internalization.

 

THE THREE-PRONGED STRATEGY OF INDIA’S PREFERENTIAL TRADE POLICY A CONTRIBUTION TO THE STUDY OF MODERN ECONOMIC TREATIES

Julien Chaisse, Debashis Chakraborty, and Biswajit Nag

Abstract: Before the inception of the WTO, India generally did not pursue any regional economic agreement route to promote trade or to achieve any other goal. In the Post-Cancun Ministerial period, however, it has progressively entered into a number of preferential trade arrangements with several Asian, as well as non- Asian partners. Looking into India’s regional economic integration approach, the current analysis makes an attempt to identify the major determinants behind the shift in the country’s interests, and the policy implications of this change. We conclude that India’s approach towards preferential trade can be depicted as a three-pronged PTA strategy: it can compensate for loss in the goods sector through gain in services or within the goods sector; loss in some sectors (due to tariff reduction) is to be compensated through effective market access of other products in which India has a potential advantage; or identification of India’s specific interest in the partner country (which may be commercial, regional development or political).  Link to PDF

Notes

LET DIGITAL TECHNOLOGY LAY THE MORAL RIGHT OF INTEGRITY TO REST

Albert Fang

The Connecticut Journal of International Law invites the submission of articles and book reviews on international law topics. Citations should conform to the most recent edition of The Bluebook: A Uniform System of Citation, published by The Harvard Law Review Association.

Submissions are requested to be sent via email. The Journal will accept articles in most major word processing formats including Microsoft Word, WordPerfect, and Rich Text Format ("RTF").

Submissions may also be sent to the Journal care of the Editor-in-Chief at:

Editor-in-Chief
Connecticut Journal of International Law
University of Connecticut School of Law
65 Elizabeth Street
Hartford, CT 06105-2290