A large glass and concrete building with the sign "Tillburg University" on the top left part of the roof.
Tilburg University
Dates to Remember

Applications Due:
  Friday, February 14, 2014
Interviews:
  February 19-26, 2014
Decisions:
  March 3, 2014
Accepted Students Meeting:
  March 17, 2014

Studying abroad was, by far, one of my best (if not THE best) experiences in law school. I recommend it to absolutely every student no matter what their future career plans may be. Not only did I get the opportunity to take courses that are not offered here at UConn, but I was exposed to a much broader perspective of the law while studying at Tilburg. The school draws hundreds of international students each semester, so it is more of a truly international environment than I ever expected. I made friends from around the world and learned more than I ever imagined, not just about law, but politics, business, culture, etc.

Margaret Hallet
Tilburg, Fall 2008

Spending a semester abroad at Tilburg University was the opportunity of a lifetime. In my six months in The Netherlands I was fortunate enough to gain valuable knowledge both inside and outside the classroom that will provide me with an edge in achieving my lifetime goals.

Kathleen Carey
Tilburg, Spring 2010

Founded in 1927, Tilburg University, located in the Netherlands, is a fully accredited, government financed university that specializes in the social sciences.  There are almost 10,000 students completing degrees in five different faculties: Economics and Business Administration, Law, Social and Behavioral Sciences, Philosophy and Arts. The university is small and easy to navigate.

The Tilburg University Faculty of Law was founded in 1963. The faculty offers four degree programs: Dutch Law, Tax Law, Administrative Law and Public Administration, and European Law. The law faculty is comprised of 30 professors, 15 senior lecturers, and 150 junior lecturers.

Program Duration

Students choosing to study at Tilburg University can opt to attend the university for one semester in the fall or spring.  There is an orientation in late August and classes begin in September and run through the middle of December. Spring semester starts in late January and exams are in May and June.

Cultural Enrichment

Tilburg is The Netherlands' sixth largest city located in the Province of Brabant. The population is just over 205,000 and it is located about 1.5 hours by train from Amsterdam and 2 hours by train from Brussels.

Tilburg  began as a place where small farming communities sprouted up because of  the herd routes, which were connected by narrow roads. Laborers, tradesmen and manufacturers built their homes along these connecting roads ultimately shaping the town.  The woollen industry was the main employer for two centuries.  By 1881 Tilburg had over 145 wool mills and was a chief exporter of raw materials for weavers. This industry remained important to the city until its collapse in the 1960s.

Fortunately at that time, the University of Tilburg was growing and expanding and beginning to contribute to modern intellectual society.  In 1962, the University of Tilburg moved its campus west of the city center so it would have more area to expand. This also allowed for modern business development in its vacated factory grounds.   Thus began the emphasis on a new creative thought and knowledge based economy which continues to contribute to the city by creating numerous collaborations between the universities and the many businesses based there. 

Most of the shops, hotels, restaurants and cafes are conveniently located in the city center not far from the University campus and there are a number of unique neighborhood events such as the Art in Open Space, which providesfor artworks throughout the city.  

 

Our program with Tilburg University is designed to give students a chance to study Business or Administrative Law in a diverse international setting.  Because Tilburg encourages foreign exchanges and has over 350 international students annually, the classroom is as diverse as the student center and the dormitories.

Sample Course Offerings

Internal Market Law

This course aims at presenting the foundations and the functioning of the EU internal market in a comprehensive manner. The internal market is one of the centerpieces of European integration, making up its core provisions and original raison d'être. The rules on internal market have spawned not only a considerable amount of EU legislation and case-law but also intense political and academic debates. At first sight, internal market law might seem like a sprawling mix of conflicting ECJ cases and perplexing secondary legislation. Through a case-based approach, this course provides the student with a solid basis to understand this area of EU law and to form a critical and well-reasoned opinion on it. It also deals with some key issues of market integration in Europe which are of both practical and political relevance. The core of the course relates to the mechanics of the four freedoms (goods, services, capital and persons) which form the cornerstone of the internal market. It analyses the way in which market integration is achieved within the EU (and the European Economic Area), discussing both negative integration - the abolishment of national obstacles - and positive integration - integration through harmonization of national laws. Specific issues that are covered include: institutional aspects of harmonization (different forms, New Approach) the direct effect of the free movement provisions, the concept of public (economic) services, social aspects of the internal market regarding consumer protection, fundamental rights etc.
    
Human Rights Law

The course starts with a general introduction into the historical and judicial background of this emerging body of international human rights law. The main characteristics and the 'peculiarities' of international human rights law will be discussed. It also deals with the major issues of substantive law, the universality/relativism debate, and the so-called three generations, as contained in the various universal and regional instruments and the state obligations under human rights law. This part also concerns the procedural aspects of the international law of human rights, i.e. its implementation and the supervision thereof. Non-judicial or political mechanisms of supervision as well as quasi-judicial and judicial mechanisms are surveyed, i.e., on the basis of case-law. The efforts undertaken in this area by the major international and regional organizations namely the United Nations, the Council of Europe, and the EU will be dealt with. The role of actors other than states will also be examined. Furthermore, specific rights will be studied, for instance, the rights to non-discrimination, to health and development.

International Relations in Historical Perspective

The purpose of this class is to gain an understanding of recent historical developments in international relations with regard to great power politics and security. Apart from a brief introduction about the major schools of thought in 20th-century International Relations Theory (classes 1-2), two themes will be covered. The first, and most extensive, part of the course covers the Cold War (1947-1991). Over 6 classes (3-8), the major phases and crises of the Cold War will be studied chronologically. The focus therefore will not so much be on events, but on the analysis of the security policies

Contact: 
International Affairs Office 
Ms. Tessa Barten 
Room M-101b 
Phone: 011-31-13- 4668377 
Fax: 011-31-13-4663143 
Email: law-exchange@tilburguniversity.edu

Prepare for Arrival: http://www.tilburguniversity.edu/education/exchange-programmes/practical...

Upon Arrival: http://www.tilburguniversity.edu/education/exchange-programmes/practical...

Daily Life in Tilburg: http://www.tilburguniversity.edu/education/exchange-programmes/practical...