Professor David Thaw and Joel A. Henry '14 are Researching and Presenting on the Law of Armed Conflict and Cyber Warfare

Professor David Thaw and Joel A. Henry '14 are Researching and Presenting on the Law of Armed Conflict and Cyber Warfare
November 20, 2013
Hartford, CT

A research project sparked by a student paper is resulting in invitations for Professor David Thaw and student Joel A. Henry ’14 to present their findings at places like the Pentagon and NATO conferences.

For the last year-and-a-half, Thaw and Henry, who previously served as a captain the U.S. Air Force and is currently a Cyberspace Operations Officer of the 103rd Airlift Wing, CT Air National Guard, have been conducting research into the Law of Armed Conflict and its application to cyber operations and warfare.

At the end of October, Thaw spoke about their research at a conference on "Internet Governance & Cyber Conflicts: Models, Regulations and Confidence Building Measures" hosted by SUNY Albany and Moscow State University. Both men have been invited to present at a follow-up conference in Germany in April. On Thursday November 7, Thaw and Henry traveled to the Pentagon to speak to members of the Office of the Secretary of Defense for Cyberspace Policy, the Joint Staff, and the Office of the Secretary of Defense General Counsel.

On Wednesday November 20, Thaw is participating in the NATO Cyber Defense Academic Outreach - Next Generation Capabilities Workshop at the National Defense University in Washington, D.C.  It is an invitation-only workshop convened jointly with NATO's Allied Command Transformation to address cyber defense capabilities.

Thaw is a visiting assistant professor at UConn Law. He is a law and technology expert whose research and scholarship examine the regulation of the Internet and computing technologies, with specific focus on cybersecurity regulation and cybercrime.

To help inform their research Thaw and Henry have hosted roundtable discussions with U.S. and Russian counterparts. They plan to publish an article in 2014 summarizing their findings.